When a movement like LIV Golf arises, it can have a disturbingly disruptive effect on the established order, which in this case was the long-standing installation of professional golf in the United States and Europe.

Few negotiated the breakneck pace at which the Greg Norman-led, Saudi-funded parallel league ran between June and November to shake things up. Between June and the end of October, LIV Golf and Norman dictated the conversation.

And it wasn’t all hot air either. A total of $225 million was paid out as prize money from the parallel league funded by Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund, $50 million for the season-ending team championship at the golf course of Donald Trump in Miami alone.

Every player associated with LIV Golf has won money, from $120,000 from the latest Andy Ogletree to $35.6 million from individual and team winner Dustin Johnson. And with an expanded schedule under a new name coming for the 2023 season, Norman’s attempt to shake the tree appears to have been successful.

We will know how much he develops and grows in the next two seasons. There is the issue of world ranking points which is still pending. These points help players gain entry to major events like the four major tournaments – the US Open, Augusta Masters, PGA Championship (all in the US) and the Open in Great Britain.

Currently, the system for scoring tournaments and calculating ranking points in professional golf is provided by Official World Golf Ranking, which is largely funded and supported by the existing establishment, including the PGA of America, PGA Tour, the European PGA Tour, the Royal and Ancient, the US Golf Association and two other entities.

And so far, OWGR has denied – for various reasons – any ranking points to LIG Golf events and players. As it rates 23 tours in all, including our Domestic PGTI, Asian Tour, and MENA (Middle East and North Africa) Tour, the OWGR is an important tool in the hands of the establishment, primarily the PGA Tour and the DP World (European tour).

They resisted the presence of LIV and its players by imposing penalties, bans and other coercive methods. But there was at least one annoying backfire. Spaniard Adrian Otaguei challenged the European Tour suspension, had him legally suspended and won the Andalusian Masters in his home country under the DPWT banner.

He then returned to play the LIV Golf final in Miami.

And with so much money available to golfers, it’s going to happen more and more.

Next year, the breakaway circuit will rebrand itself as LIV Golf League, increase available prize money by 63% to $405 million from the $225 million given out this year, and expand to 14 events around the world. The season will start in February and end in September with Asia and Australia joining the list of venues.

There’s already talk of Greg Norman having completed his additional signings for the new season and once the schedule is released in November, speculation will really start on what’s to come.

In the meantime, here is the full list of earnings earned by LIV Golf members this year. A total of 68 different players took part and 52 of them won over $1 million, including Anirban Lahiri who took home $4.2 million.

The 2022 Money List:

1. Dustin Johnson – $35,637,767
2. Branden Grace – $16,634,666
3. Peter Uihlein – $12,814,786
4. Patrick Reed – $12,210,714
5. Talor Gooch- $10,374,500
6. Brooks Koepka – $8,276,100
7. Charl Schwartzel – $8,135,000
8. Pat Perez – $8,023,500
9. Cam Smith – $7,378,500
10. Eugenio Chacarra – $6,932,000
11. Carlos Ortiz – $6,135,314
12. Sergio Garcia – $6,128,786
13. Henrik Stenson – $5,566,000
14. Louis Oosthuizen – $5,395,167
15. Joaquin Niemann – $4,524,286
16. Matthew Wolff – $4,226,167
17. Paul Casey – $4,543,367
18. Hennie du Plessis – $4,530,000
19. Abraham Ancer – $4,445,500
20. Chase Koepka – $4,328,964
21. Lee Westwood – $4,272,914
22. Anirban Lahiri – $4,226,000
23. Jason Kokrak – $3,959,500
24. Richard Bland – $3,545,833
25. Sam Horsfield – $3,534,000
26. Bryson DeChambeau – $3,511,750
27. Matt Jones- $3,404,700
28. Wade Ormsby – $3,069,500
29. Ian Poulter – $3,003,333
30. Charles Howell III – $2,995,333
31.Marc Leishman – $2,968,000
32. Laurie Galop – $2,906,950
33. Sihwan Kim – $2,382,000
34. Graeme McDowell – $2,373,381
35. James Piot – $1,936,000
36. Kevin Na – $1,914,286
37. Martin Kaymer – $1,911,800
38. Phachara Khongwatmai – $1,858,333
39. Bernd Wiesberger – $1,843,500
40. Phil Mickelson – $1,825,350
41. Turkish Pettit – $1,691,000
42. Justin Harding – $1,319,167
43. Scott Vincent – $1,498,700
44. Harold Varner III – $1,457,500
45. Jinichiro Kozuma – $1,205,000
46. ​​Sadom Kaewkanjana – $1,312,286
47. Jediah Morgan – $1,395,000
48. Adrien Otaegui – $1,294,500
49. Hudson Swafford – $1,241,000
50. Shaun Norris – $1,006,000
51. Cameron Tringale – $1,091,200
52. Shergo Al Kurdi – $1,044,000
53. Travis Smyth – $846,000
54. Hideto Tanihara – $752,600
55. Olivier Bekker – $737,500
56. Ryōsuke Kinoshita – $624,000
57. Yuki Inamori – $501,000
58. David Puig – $405,000
59. Ian Snyman – $316,000
60. Pablo Larrazabal – $315,000
61. Blake Windred – $263,000
62. Itthipat Buranatanyarat – $249,000
63. JC Ritchie – $226,000
64. Viraj Madappa – $154,000
65. Kevin Yuan – $146,000
66. Oliver Fisher – $136,000
67. Ratchanon Chantananuwat (A) – $136,000
68. Andy Ogletree – $120,000

Ratchanon Chantananuwat’s winnings were donated to a charity of his choice, with the Thai star retaining his amateur status.

(Livgolf.com source list)