SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Arizona State’s No. 4 men’s golf team won the hearts of Sun Devil Nation on a magical run to the national title, ultimately failing in a 3-2 clash against No. 7 Texas at Grayhawk Golf Club.

Arizona State nearly won its third national championship with match wins of Mason Andersen and David Puig, leaving the result up in the balance for the final game of the day. The Sun Devils clashed with the Longhorns after beating defending national champions No. 6 Pepperdine and taking down top-ranked Oklahoma earlier in the week.

“What are my emotions? There are so many, it’s hard to hold them back, honestly,” the head coach said Matt Thurmond. “I think the coolest thing is how much they (the team) love each other. If you watch them, you can just tell. They care about each other, and they’re going to miss those seniors, and how much they wanted to win for each other and how hard they played. Anyway, they fought until the end, so I’m really proud.

Hundreds of Sun Devil fans came to Grayhawk Golf Club to witness the program’s attempt to make history. The crowd was passionate and hard-hitting throughout the afternoon, giving Arizona State the feel of a home tournament.

The national finalists achieved the best result in Sun Devil men’s golf history since 1996 – 25 years ago, when the team brought the championship trophy home to Tempe. They built on last season’s third-place effort, setting up back-to-back historic finishes.

“It’s a painful loss, you don’t often get the chance to win national championships and we had a chance at the very end and it takes so much to get here. I’m disappointed for them because it was a such a special group.”

RESULTS IN MATCH PLAY (2-3)

MASON ANDERSEN DEF. COLE HAMMER, 3&2

Mason Andersen controlled his game all the way, quickly taking the lead and never giving up. He led by as much as four points during the game, eventually sealing the deal on the 16th to secure the Sun Devils’ first point.

PARKER COODY DEF. JAMES LEOW, 6&5

PIERCESON COODY DEF. PRESTON SUMMERHAYS, 2&1

DAVID PUIG DEF. MASON NOME, 19 HOLES
An epic battle unfolded between David Puig and his opponent Mason Nome. They would need more than 18 holes to decide because it was a playoff. Back in the 10, Puig beat Nome to secure the second point and even the game.

TRAVIS VICK DEF. CAMERON SISK, 1 MORE

NOTABLES

  • It’s the program’s best result since winning the 1996 NCAA championship.
  • Mason Andersen went 3-0 in match play, capping his epic performance with victory over Cole Hammer in the Championship
    • Hammer had already beaten 2019 national champion Matthew Wolff and 2022 national champion Gordon Sargent in a previous match play competition.

  • The first seven seeds to capture a national title since LSU in 2015.
  • Since the championship switched to Match Play format in 2009, Arizona State is the first team to defeat both the defending national champion and runner-up in the same season.

SEMI-FINAL RESULTS – ASU DEFEAT PEPPERDINE (Reigning National Champions),

In a match where nothing seemed decided except Preston Summerhays winning when it was 5-10, that’s exactly what wasn’t decided until hole 18.

Summerhays lost five of six holes after taking the lead. Mason Andersen was from 1 to 12, then with a few clicks of Golfstat was down from 2 to 16. Meanwhile, David Puig took a lead on six that seemed…just OK…but not overwhelming. Never more than two, and a hole for a large part.


Those three eventual winners didn’t blink, though Andersen lost holes 14, 15 and 16 and won four holes in total. He trailed after the holes for half the game. Summerhays lost five of six holes in the streak…then birdied the final two holes to win.

QUARTER-FINAL RESULTS – ASU DEFEAT OKLAHOMA, 3-2
Arizona State and top-ranked Oklahoma had an intense battle that ended in Cameron Sisk hitting a birdie putt in an extra hole at No. 10. Getting points for ASU was Mason Andersen (1-up with a birdie out of 18 to win), Preston Summerhays (7 and 5 on first-team All-American and Haskins Award winner Chris Gotterup) and Cameron Sisk win in 18 holes over Stephen Campbell.

Andersen’s game never had a lead greater than one hole. Patrick Welch was 1-10, but Andersen tied it at No. 12. On the 18th, Andersen hit a great second shot and buried the birdie putt.