Traditionally, golf is not one of the sports that is talked about a lot in minority communities. This is partly because of the way some black people were traditionally treated when trying to access a course. “The only thing you saw was black shopping carts,” Malachi Knowles said. Latest: WPBF sports coverage 25 NewsBut constant work is being done behind the scenes to ensure minorities get in and stay in the game. Knowles has helped pave the way for many black golfers, having practiced playing locally since the age of 10. He remembers the days in the 1950s when black people were not allowed to play on certain golf courses. golf course as it existed at the time,” Knowles said. Knowles has since become the founder of the African American Golfers Hall of Fame and was inducted into the Florida Black Sports Hall of Fame. He said minorities should fight for equality. Black History Month: Traveling Wax Museum Makes History in Fort PierceHowever, 60 years later, there is still work to be done. the first black country club in the history of Palm Beach County, established in 1954. “Fairview created this atmosphere where we have four people, we have 8 people, we have 16 people. It was a necessary organization,” said said Clark. According to Zippia.com, of the approximately 7,500 professional golfers in America, only 9% are black. “We have to find a way to attract young people. This question is, do they feel the need to participate in a group organized golf,” Clark said. “It’s what golf does for you. It gets you in the game,” Knowles said. Black History Month: A Delray Beach nonprofit teaches the black community how to swim, breaking down disparities. Knowles is also the founder of Inner City Youth Golfers. A diverse group opens doors. “You become a decision maker. You can sit at the corporate table,” Knowles added. “’There are no guns, there are no knives,’ I tell all my kids. They can be number one. They can go to school. trouble. They can succeed, they can succeed, they can achieve.”

Traditionally, golf has not been a popular sport in minority communities.

Part of the reason is because of how some black people have historically been treated when trying to take a course.

“The only thing you saw was black shopping carts,” Malachi Knowles said.

The last: WPBF 25 News Sports Coverage

But, constant work is being done behind the scenes to make sure minorities get in and stay in the game.

Knowles helped pave the way for many black golfers, having played the game locally since he was 10 years old. He remembers the time in the 1950s when black people were not allowed to play on certain golf courses.

“They wouldn’t leave us, pretty much, on that golf course as it was then,” Knowles said.

Knowles has since become the founder of the African American Golfers Hall of Fame and was inducted into the Florida Black Sports Hall of Fame. He said minorities should fight for equality.

Black History Month: Traveling wax museum makes history in Fort Pierce

However, 60 years later, there is still work to be done.

“I think we’re turning the corner a bit,” Knowles said.

Martha Clark is the president of the Fairview Country Club. It is the first black country club in Palm Beach County history, established in 1954.

“Fairview created this atmosphere where we have four people, we have 8 people, we have 16 people. It was a necessary organization,” Clark said.

According to Zippia.com, of nearly 7,500 professional golfers in America, only 9% are black.

“We have to find a way to attract young people. That question is whether they feel the need to participate in an organized golf group,” Clark said.

“That’s what golf does for you. It gets you in the game,” Knowles said.

Black History Month: Delray Beach nonprofit teaches black community how to swim, breaking disparities

Knowles is also the founder of Inner City Youth Golfers. He said getting more young black people to understand that playing golf in a diverse group opens doors.

“You become a decision-maker. You get to sit at the corporate table,” Knowles added. “’There are no guns, there are no knives,’ I tell all my kids. They can be number one. They can go to school. trouble. They can make it, they can make it, they can make it.”